Delhi Airport is getting rid of the carpets!

Count this into stuff that does not affect us, but we still need to know. The Delhi Airport Terminal 3 opened roughly about eight years ago, and at that time was the most modern terminal in India. The GMR group no doubt put in a lot of effort in the product they produced, but in the end, people seemed to remember one of the two things, the Hand Murals on arrival, or the Brown carpets on departure.

Delhi Airport Terminal 3

Delhi Airport Terminal 3 (The artifacts on the left)

I’ve long figured I found the airport too bland after I started using the new Mumbai Terminal 2 which mostly is a museum posing as an airport terminal.  However, I never came to realize that people had even an intense dislike for these carpets. They have been tweeting about it since forever it seems.

Moreover, all it took was one Tweet earlier this month to move things. Except, this time the Tweet was not to the airport but the aviation ministry.

Now it may look like one Tweet, but just in his usual style, the aviation ministry took note of the Tweet and passed it along to the Delhi Airport Twitter team for, well, some response. This is how Indian bureaucracy works, and this could have just been ignored, and that would be the end of this.

Except, Delhi Airport maybe caved in and decided those carpets be no longer required.

Now, one part of me is happy that Indian airports are becoming so PROactive, the other part of me is not so pleased because this is not a decision they made on the back of one Tweet. The whole of Delhi Airport is supposed to undergo a new development as a part of the next masterplan of the airport, and this could be a part of that redevelopment plan.

Oh, and remember, the best airport in the world, Changi, also has carpets, tonnes of them. Moreover, so do many airports around the globe. At Delhi Airport, the carpeting is done in the secure holding area, where technically people are not supposed to have heavy bags (just 7 kg per person, remember?) So, how on earth are people having problems with the carpets of all things. I use the walkway all the time, and it works out fine for me.

Where do you stand on the carpet debate at Delhi Airport? Did you like those carpets or did you find them messy and an eyesore?

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  1. Carpets at airports are just wrong. Regardless of whether it’s Delhi, London, Singapore or any other airport. Most look somewhere between tacky and awful and are stained because passengers simply don’t care whatever they drop onto the carpets.

    While there’s plenty of ugly hard flooring in airports (or other buildings) around the world as well, even the most ugly hard flooring hasn’t come close to the tackyness of carpets… well… at least in my point of view.

    Obviously, a lot of this is a matter of personal perception, where the concept of “right” and “wrong” doesn’t really exist.

    Nonetheless – I, for one, applaud every airport that ends up correcting the mistake of using carpet.

  2. I have been many times through the terminal almost once every month. A quick snack at Amex lounge near gate 28 and then 37 Gate to catch the flight. Never had a problem because of carpets.

  3. the colour and design is crap … it is stained at so many places… in a hot country/city it adds to the heat inside thus requiring more energy to cool up the place. Hard floor with good tiles/marble type of tiles will give a clean and shining look and will make it look even more spacious and comforting to the eyes. The mustard colour throughout is so monotone and unpleasing to the eye. Good they are getting rid of it.

  4. May be one of the exception but I actually prefer the carpet.

    When dragging the trolley, it ensures no annoying noise by other passengers. Compared to the escalator or even hard floor.

  5. I’ve passed through IGIA T3 plenty of times myself. I have to say, I wouldn’t have even been able to tell you whether or not there was carpet if I was asked.

    So, I guess the carpet isn’t offensive to me.

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